October, 2023

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STAT+: Pharmacists can make shortage drugs, but at what cost?

STAT

Pharmacists increasingly are being asked to make drugs in bulk for hospitals that are in short supply, and they’re even beginning to make chemotherapies. But some in the industry worry about the unintended consequences of overreliance. Hospitals’ reliance on pharmacist-made drugs, a practice called compounding, has risen in step with worsening drug shortages.

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Pfizer to cut costs, lay off staff on waning demand for COVID products

BioPharma Dive

Sales of Pfizer's antiviral Paxlovid and shot Comirnaty have been slower than it anticipated, while a shift to the commercial market for the antiviral has been delayed.

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Actor and epilepsy advocate Greg Grunberg wants the world to ‘talk about it’

PharmaVoice

The actor of “Heroes” and “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” fame is starring in another role as a patient advocate for people with epilepsy.

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Sodium valproate reclassification ushers in full pack dispensing

The Pharmacist

All licensed medicines containing sodium valproate, valproic acid and semisodium valproate have been reclassified as special containers, meaning they are subject to full pack dispensing. The change, effective since 1 October, means that where the prescription quantity is not available in an original pack size or multiple of pack sizes, the nearest number of full […] The post Sodium valproate reclassification ushers in full pack dispensing appeared first on The Pharmacist.

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Position Your Pharmacy for Expansion

Speaker: Chris Antypas and Josh Halladay

Access to limited distribution drugs and payer contracts are key to pharmacy expansion. But how do you prepare your operations to take the next step? Meaningful data: Collect and share clinical data regarding outcomes, utilization, and more Reporting: Limited distribution models require efficient tracking and reporting systems Workflows: Align workflows with specific pharma and payer contractual requirements For in-depth, expert insights on pharmacy expansion, watch this webinar from Inovalon.

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Cipla Foundation, NIMHANS partner to set up neuro-palliative care unit

Express Pharma

Cipla Foundation in partnership with National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro-Sciences (NIMHANS) has set up a neuro-palliative care unit in Bengaluru. The company informed that this unit has provided support to over 2,000 individuals with neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s, Dementia, and Parkinson’s, through in-patient, out-patient, home care, and has offered teleconsultation services to patients as well as their families and caregivers. it also informed that at this ne

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LogiPharma USA 2023: Tracy Nasarenko Provides a Synopsis of “DSCSA—Final Checks to Have Before Deadlines.”

Pharmaceutical Commerce

In an interview at LogiPharma USA 2023 with Pharma Commerce Editor Nicholas Saraceno, Tracy Nasarenko, Sr. Director of Community Engagement for Pharmaceuticals, GS1 US highlights her “DSCSA—Final Checks to Have Before Deadlines.

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A decade later, biotech’s CRISPR revolution is still going strong

BioPharma Dive

Once the specialty of a few select drugmakers, CRISPR gene editing is now an essential technology for a growing group of biotechs, many led by former students of the field's pioneering scientists.

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Patient groups have become a powerhouse in R&D. Here’s a look at their impact.

PharmaVoice

“They have the money,” and they’re using it to influence drug development, according to the executive director of the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science.

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CAR-TCR 2023 – Matt Lakelin

pharmaphorum

At CAR-TCR in Boston last month, pharmaphorum’s Jonah Comstock caught up with Matt Lakelin, co-founder of TrakCel, a software company that helps makers of advanced therapies manage their supply chain.

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Hyloris wins painkiller approval amidst amplified anti-opioid efforts

Pharmaceutical Technology

The FDA approved Hyloris’s non-opioid painkiller as the agency increases efforts to mitigate an opioid crisis.

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5 Reasons to Upgrade Your Pharmacy Management Software

Are you still using workarounds to manage your daily operations? To achieve peak performance, it's time to explore other options for specialty and infusion pharmacy software. Streamline pharmacy operations and improve clinical performance with automated processing, real-time data exchange, and electronic decision support. Download this helpful infographic to: Drive efficiency and patient adherence from referral receipt to delivery and ongoing care – all with our Pharmacy Cloud.

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Topical Ketamine: A Promising New Avenue for PTSD Treatment

Pharmacy Times

Ketamine topical cream may alleviate symptoms of PTSD without causing the adverse effects and abuse potential often associated with other forms of ketamine administration.

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Extreme heat could lead to 233% increase in U.S. excess cardiovascular deaths, study says

STAT

When the human body is exposed to extreme heat, it tries to fight back. To keep us from cooking, our hearts pump faster and harder to distribute the hot blood out to our fingers and toes, away from precious internal organs. We produce more sweat, and when it evaporates, the blood beneath the skin’s surface cools down, helping to lower our body temperature.

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Verve gets FDA green light to run base editing study in US

BioPharma Dive

The trial, which is ongoing in the U.K. and New Zealand, has been on hold in the U.S. since late last year as the FDA sought more details on Verve’s in vivo treatment for heart disease.

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The ALS therapy keeping the human pig heart transplant pumping

PharmaVoice

Eledon’s investigational ALS drug tegoprubart could also help prevent organ transplant rejections, the company says.

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How the rise of medical device use in pharma R&D is driving wearable technology in healthcare and revolutionising the medical industry

pharmaphorum

How the rise of medical device use in pharma R&D is driving wearable technology in healthcare and revolutionising the medical industry Mike.

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STAT+: Tracking the FDA advisory panel on the first CRISPR-based treatment for sickle cell disease

STAT

The Food and Drug Administration is convening a meeting of outside experts on Tuesday to review exa-cel, a CRISPR-based treatment for sickle cell disease made by Vertex Pharmaceuticals and CRISPR Therapeutics. Tuesday’s meeting is set up a bit differently than most FDA advisory panels. The agency has not raised any concerns about exa-cel’s efficacy or safety, and there will not be a typical vote at the end of the day on whether the data from exa-cel’s pivotal clinical trial

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Opinion: I lost my son to OxyContin. ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ is my Sackler revenge fantasy

STAT

Editor’s note: This essay contains spoilers for the Netflix show “The Fall of the House of Usher.” “W atch “ The Fall of the House of Usher” on Netflix when you can. F**cking Great! Totally based on the Sacklers—Fictional obviously but so damn good!

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STAT+: In major test for prime editing, scientists successfully correct mutations in monkeys

STAT

Prime Medicine said Friday it successfully used a new, ultra-versatile form of genetic surgery called prime editing to edit liver cells in monkeys. The results, presented at the European Society of Gene & Cell Therapy meeting in Brussels, are a major step for a technology that could transform treatment of numerous diseases. “I think the big celebration here is we’re showing, in primates, for the company, that we have a delivery system that is working and is safe,” said J

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‘We’re absolutely making it too hard’: The complexity of adult immunization delivery hinders vaccine uptake

STAT

Alison Buttenheim was floored by a sign she saw in her doctor’s office when she went to get the first jab of the two-dose shingles vaccine to protect her against painful flare-ups of varicella zoster. “Medicare patients cannot receive Tdap or zoster vaccines here. They need to obtain [them] at their pharmacy. If they receive it here, they need to pay out of pocket,” the notice read.

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Giant sloths and woolly mammoths: Mining past creatures’ DNA for future antibiotics

STAT

PHILADELPHIA — Cesar de la Fuente believes the next breakthrough antibiotic might come from animals that have been dead for thousands of years. Since 2021, his lab here at the University of Pennsylvania has built algorithms to trawl genetic databases for protein fragments, called peptides, with microbe-squashing properties. They started with human DNA.

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AstraZeneca, maker of FluMist, seeks to allow at-home administration of vaccine

STAT

People eligible to use the only needle-free flu vaccine available in the United States may be able, next year, to give it to themselves or to eligible children at home. AstraZeneca, which makes the vaccine FluMist, announced Tuesday it has submitted to the Food and Drug Administration a supplemental biologics license application that would allow for self-administration of the vaccine by people ages 18 through 49, and would allow people 18 and older to give the vaccine to eligible children.

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Maternal Covid-19 vaccination offers infants immunity for up to 6 months

STAT

The risks of severe neonatal morbidity, neonatal death, and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit were all significantly lower during the first month of birth in infants whose mothers were vaccinated against Covid-19, and protection against the virus continued for up to six months after birth, according to a new study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics.

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What will it take to end the crisis of Black deaths in the U.S.?

STAT

In the last two decades, Black Americans have suffered 1.63 million excess deaths compared to white Americans. Experts gathered at the STAT Summit in Boston last week to discuss the crisis of Black deaths in the U.S. and interventions that can help advance health equity. “If we continue to have a maternal health crisis, if we continue to have an infant mortality crisis … then we’re going to potentially see a situation or circumstance where Black people can be extinct in the

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STAT+: For Parkinson’s disease, advances spurred by Apple Watch offer a glimmer of hope

STAT

Since the Apple Watch was unveiled in 2014, it has been trumpeted not only as a high tech fashion accessory, but also as a way for people to track their own health and fitness. It has evolved as a popular cardio tool for such uses as heart rate monitoring, recording your ECG, and measuring the oxygen saturation of your blood. But now, after nearly a decade of development, the Apple Watch is being leveraged on an entirely new health frontier: Parkinson’s disease, the degenerative brain dis

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Fixing America’s health insurance woes is ‘actually very simple,’ says leading economist

STAT

Fixing the U.S. health care system can seem like a herculean task. But the solution is “actually very simple,” according to Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist Amy Finkelstein. In their recent book “ We’ve Got You Covered: Rebooting American Health Care ,” Finkelstein and Stanford economist Liran Einav describe how years of research have led them to the conclusion that the best way forward is for the U.S. to offer universal basic health care coverag

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Researchers try to tease out possible ties between long Covid and menopause

STAT

When she stopped getting her period in March 2022, Daryn Schwartz wasn’t especially concerned. At 42, she had recently come off birth control, and figured her cycles were still adjusting. When it hadn’t come back by the summer, she sought gynecological care, but was told to wait it out. So she did, with no changes. She was having other symptoms, too — fatigue, chronic pain, and difficulty focusing.

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STAT+: Sarepta’s Duchenne gene therapy fails to meet primary endpoint in pivotal trial

STAT

Sarepta Therapeutics said Monday afternoon that its gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy failed to improve muscle function compared to a placebo in a large clinical trial — likely a major disappointment for patients and doctors who have been desperately awaiting the treatment for years. The company said all patients in the study improved and that secondary measurements indicated the drug was having an effect.

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STAT+: UnitedHealth discontinues a controversial brand amid scrutiny of algorithmic care denials

STAT

UnitedHealth Group and Optum are getting rid of the name of their tech-driven care management company just months after the company faced congressional criticism over the use of its algorithms to cut off payments for patients’ care. Discontinuing the NaviHealth name is part of a broader rebranding of Optum’s division that provides services to people at home and in post-acute facilities.

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Zuckerberg and Chan announce a New York biohub to build disease-fighting cellular machines

STAT

Meta founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, pediatrician and philanthropist Priscilla Chan, announced on Wednesday plans to invest $250 million over 10 years to establish a new “biohub” in New York City focused on building a new class of cellular machines that can surveil the body and snuff out disease. The new initiative, publicly revealed at the 2023 STAT Summit and previewed exclusively to STAT, is the latest program from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, or CZI, a company the coup

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CDC recommends rationing of RSV shot due to shortages

STAT

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended rationing an important monoclonal antibody product to protect young infants from RSV due to strained supply of the new product, Sanofi’s Beyfortus. In a health alert issued Monday, the CDC said clinicians should prioritize available doses for babies at highest risk from respiratory syncytial virus, reserving 100-milligram doses for infants under the age of 6 months and those with underlying health conditions that put them at h

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STAT+: Oncologists more likely to provide low-value care after receiving pharma money, study finds

STAT

Oncologists were more likely to provide low-value cancer care after receiving money from pharmaceutical companies, and the findings raise questions about the extent to which industry influence may have led to patient harm, according to a new study. The study looked at two scenarios: medications that were not recommended for treating a particular cancer, such as denosumab, which is administered for prostate cancer, and GCSF medications that are used to stimulate the bone marrow to make blood cell

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Serotonin levels are depleted in long Covid patients, study says, pointing to a potential cause for ‘brain fog’

STAT

If you’ve been following the mystery of long Covid since it emerged in 2020, you’ll recall interferons and serotonin have been clues from the start as combatants in the body’s prolonged battles against the virus. Theories about why symptoms persist long after the acute infection has cleared often point to two suspects: viral reservoirs where SARS-CoV-2 lingers and inflammation sparked by the infection that doesn’t subside.

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Is there a nursing shortage in the United States? Depends on who you ask

STAT

Hospitals are frustrated with a nationwide nursing shortage that’s only gotten worse since the pandemic. In 2022, the American Hospital Association quoted an estimate that half a million nurses would leave the field by the end of that year, bringing the total shortage to 1.1 million. At the same time, National Nurses United insists there isn’t a nurse shortage at all.

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Opinion: Yes, everyone should get an updated Covid-19 vaccine

STAT

Last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that everyone in the U.S. 6 months and older receive an updated Covid vaccine targeting the XBB.1.5 variant. Since then, some notable voices, including Paul Offit , have publicly questioned whether the updated vaccine is needed for those who are not in a high-risk group. He recently wrote, “At this point in the pandemic, it is hard to make a case for vaccinating everyone.

Vaccines 364
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STAT+: Like a vampire, some cancer cells can suck the energy source from immune cells

STAT

As elite hunters of the immune system, T cells are constantly prowling our bodies for diseased cells to attack. But when they encounter a tumor, something unexpected can happen. New research shows that some cancer cells can fire a long nanotube projection into the T cell that, like a vampire’s fang, sucks energy-creating mitochondria from the immune cell, turning the predator into prey.

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