November, 2023

article thumbnail

Pharma benefited from basing business overseas. An international tax effort could spur a rethink.

BioPharma Dive

U.S. tax law changes enacted six years ago slashed large pharma companies' rates and saved them billions. Now, a push for an international floor could disrupt their R&D accounting.

122
122
article thumbnail

STAT+: Critics say HCA’s cost-cutting is endangering Appalachian patients — a warning for the whole U.S. health care system

STAT

ASHEVILLE, N.C. — There was the beeping of monitors, the stiff sheets, the sterile smell of the hospital room. Mostly, there was pain. Sharp, relentless pain. Mike Messino was recovering from a successful surgery, but the nerve blocks had worn off. He spent two full hours waiting for a nurse to inject pain medication. When he’d worked in this hospital, he’d made sure patients didn’t wait longer than 15 minutes for that kind of care.

Hospitals 363
Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Trending Sources

article thumbnail

Texas AG sues Pfiz­er and Tris Phar­ma for adul­ter­at­ed ADHD drug

Pharmaceutical Technology

Texas AG has sued Pfizer and Tris Pharma for providing adulterated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug, Quillivant XR, to children.

141
141
article thumbnail

‘They thought I had cancer’: painkiller banned in UK linked to Britons’ deaths in Spain

The Guardian - Pharmaceutical Industry

Patients’ group says reactions to metamizole can cause sepsis and organ failure – and British and Irish people are at higher risk A patients group representing several British victims has launched legal action against the Spanish government over claims it failed to safeguard people against the potentially fatal side effects of one of the country’s most popular painkillers, involved in a series of serious illnesses and deaths.

123
123
article thumbnail

Position Your Pharmacy for Expansion

Speaker: Chris Antypas and Josh Halladay

Access to limited distribution drugs and payer contracts are key to pharmacy expansion. But how do you prepare your operations to take the next step? Meaningful data: Collect and share clinical data regarding outcomes, utilization, and more Reporting: Limited distribution models require efficient tracking and reporting systems Workflows: Align workflows with specific pharma and payer contractual requirements For in-depth, expert insights on pharmacy expansion, watch this webinar from Inovalon.

article thumbnail

Breaking: Pharmacy First to launch end of January

The Pharmacist

The highly anticipated Pharmacy First common conditions service in England is set to launch at the end of January, it has been announced. The news comes as part of a series of announcements confirmed by NHS England (NHSE) and Community Pharmacy England (CPE) today, which also included updates on contraception and hypertension services. And CPE […] The post Breaking: Pharmacy First to launch end of January appeared first on The Pharmacist.

article thumbnail

Frontiers Health 2023 Day One

pharmaphorum

Frontiers Health 23 - Day 1 from the marvellous Auditorium della Tecnica in Rome, where we are set to bring you the biggest news stories, trends, and industry insights

120
120

More Trending

article thumbnail

STAT+: Mayo Clinic to spend $5 billion on tech-heavy redesign of its Minnesota campus

STAT

Mayo Clinic will spend $5 billion to reinvent its flagship medical campus in Rochester, Minn., infusing digital technologies into several new buildings designed to present a 21st-century vision of clinical care, the organization said Tuesday. The project, to include five new buildings with 2.4 million square feet of space, will merge Mayo’s traditional medical services with its increasing investments in artificial intelligence and digital tools.

article thumbnail

Health Canada approves Jazz’s cannabis derived seizure therapy

Pharmaceutical Technology

Epidiolex has been approved as an adjunct therapy for seizures associated with three rare forms of epilepsy in patients aged two and older.

131
131
article thumbnail

Samay’s AI-assisted wearable technology accurately diagnoses COPD

Pharma Times

The device successfully diagnosed COPD in patients with 90% accuracy - News - PharmaTimes

155
155
article thumbnail

EMCrit 361 – Life Threatening Tox and Toxicologic Cardiac Arrests from the AHA

EMCrit Project

AHA Guidelines on Critical Care Toxicology EMCrit Project by Scott Weingart, MD FCCM.

122
122
article thumbnail

5 Reasons to Upgrade Your Pharmacy Management Software

Are you still using workarounds to manage your daily operations? To achieve peak performance, it's time to explore other options for specialty and infusion pharmacy software. Streamline pharmacy operations and improve clinical performance with automated processing, real-time data exchange, and electronic decision support. Download this helpful infographic to: Drive efficiency and patient adherence from referral receipt to delivery and ongoing care – all with our Pharmacy Cloud.

article thumbnail

Talking techbio with NVIDIA: Accelerated computing, NLP, and GenAI in drug discovery

pharmaphorum

Talking techbio with NVIDIA: Accelerated computing, NLP, and GenAI in drug discovery Mike.

138
138
article thumbnail

Moderna adjusts to changing outlook for COVID vaccine demand

BioPharma Dive

The company recorded a net loss in the third quarter as it “resizes” its manufacturing footprint, and now expects revenue to come in at low end of its previous guidance.

Vaccines 122
article thumbnail

STAT+: FDA investigating whether CAR-T, a treatment for cancer, can also cause lymphoma

STAT

The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that it is investigating whether CAR-T therapy, which uses genetically modified white blood cells to attack tumors, can in rare cases cause lymphoma, a blood cancer. “Although the overall benefits of these products continue to outweigh their potential risks for their approved uses, FDA is investigating the identified risk of T cell malignancy with serious outcomes, including hospitalization and death, and is evaluating the need for regulatory

Hospitals 363
article thumbnail

Japan grants approval for CSL and Arcturus’ Covid-19 vaccine 

Pharmaceutical Technology

Japan’s MHLW has approved CSL and Arcturus Therapeutics’ self-amplifying mRNA (sa-mRNA) Covid-19 vaccine, ARCT-154.

Vaccines 124
article thumbnail

Independent Rx Forum: NCPA Priorities, Legislative Updates for Independent Pharmacies

Pharmacy Times

Tune in to this episode of the Independent Rx Forum for a comprehensive overview of the National Community Pharmacists Association's legislative priorities, updates on critical pharmacy-related bills, and insights into the legislative process.

article thumbnail

Despite decades of promises, health research still overlooks women

The Guardian - Pharmaceutical Industry

With White House initiative, Jill Biden aims to change that Women are twice as likely as men to die from heart attacks. When a nonsmoker dies of lung cancer, it’s twice as likely to be a woman as a man. Continue reading.

121
121
article thumbnail

The evolving landscape of medicinal cannabis and its synergy with pharmaceutical giants

pharmaphorum

The evolving landscape of medicinal cannabis and its synergy with pharmaceutical giants Nicole.

124
124
article thumbnail

Roche’s Genentech partners with Nvidia in AI drug deal

BioPharma Dive

The partnership is another investment by the biotech subsidiary in artificial intelligence for drug discovery and development, continuing an industry trend.

128
128
article thumbnail

STAT+: Colon cancer prevention paradox: Higher-risk patients pay more for colonoscopy

STAT

Ashley Conway-Anderson was prepared for a lot of things when it came to her first colonoscopy. She sought out tips to make the daylong prep more bearable. She braced herself mentally for what the doctors would find; her mother, after all, was just a couple years out of recovery from colorectal cancer. When she awoke from the procedure, she said, things seemed relatively fine.

362
362
article thumbnail

Opinion: The next Census could undercount the number of disabled Americans by 20 million

STAT

About 20 million disabled people will be erased if the U.S. Census Bureau moves forward with changes to disability data collection methods. That is because many disabled people will no longer be counted as disabled by the new questions the Census is proposing to use starting in 2025 with the annual American Community Survey (ACS). As disabled people, and as scholars who study disability measurement and use disability data for our research, we have grave concerns about this proposed change.

363
363
article thumbnail

Pandemic-related immunity gap in kids explains surge of respiratory infections in children in China, says WHO

STAT

Reports this week that China is experiencing a surge in respiratory infections in young children triggered flashbacks of the start of the Covid-19 pandemic among infectious disease watchers. But a rapidly organized meeting Thursday between the World Health Organization and health officials in China assuaged much of that concern. The evidence presented to the WHO team pointed to what’s sometimes called an immunity gap that was created by the pandemic.

Immunity 364
article thumbnail

Surge of respiratory disease in China triggers anxiety, but experts see likely explanation

STAT

Reports of increased respiratory disease among children in China have put disease watchers elsewhere on alert, triggering anxiety that the outbreak — if it is indeed one outbreak — holds uncomfortable echoes of the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. But at present, a number of experts say the activity has a likely explanation: China’s population, especially its young children, probably developed significant immunological susceptibility to a range of respiratory pathogens d

363
363
article thumbnail

With latest tranche, U.K. Biobank has genome sequences from 500,000 people available for research

STAT

LONDON — Data from half a million people’s whole genome sequences are now available to researchers worldwide, as the U.K. Biobank on Thursday debuted the latest addition to what it aims to be the world’s most comprehensive health data resource. The Biobank has been building its collection over 20 years, with 500,000 volunteers recruited to provide survey responses about their health, medical records, tests of molecular markers, and imaging scans.

article thumbnail

Opinion: Physician and Rep. Raul Ruiz: The infectious disease doctor shortage threatens future pandemic preparedness

STAT

In 2009, I was practicing in the emergency department when the H1N1 pandemic emerged. Then, I saw firsthand the vital role infectious disease physicians played in not only facilitating a coordinated public health response, but also helping patients, providers, and the public navigate the uncertainty that comes with confronting a novel virus. While on the frontlines of that pandemic, I depended on our community’s infectious disease specialists as I worked in real-time to provide patients w

Hospitals 363
article thumbnail

STAT+: Antitrust lawsuit alleges UnitedHealth’s Optum pressured a California hospital to stop competing over physicians

STAT

UnitedHealth Group’s Optum division is already the largest employer of physicians in the United States, but allegations in a new lawsuit suggest Optum is hungry for more. Emanate Health, a nonprofit group of hospitals and physicians in California, filed a federal lawsuit Monday, alleging Optum pushed it to agree not to compete for primary care physicians, a violation of antitrust law.

Hospitals 362
article thumbnail

Opinion: Manufacturers need to be more open about a dangerous Alzheimer’s drug side effect

STAT

Since the FDA’s approval of lecanemab (marketed as Leqembi) and Medicare’s recent decision to cover the drug, I have met with Alzheimer’s patients and their loved ones who are anxious to know whether they may benefit from this new treatment. They come in hope that this new medication may slow the progression of a cruel memory-robbing and personality-eroding disease.

359
359
article thumbnail

Respiratory viruses, thrown out of whack by Covid, appear to be falling back into seasonal order

STAT

In the depths of the Covid-19 pandemic, something strange happened: For a year or two, illnesses that used to emerge like clockwork when fall and winter arrived — flu, RSV, and the myriad viruses that cause colds — did not sicken us. The cause now appears clear: The measures we took to avoid the new disease, including isolating and social distancing, muscled most other respiratory pathogens out of the cold-and-flu-season picture.

363
363
article thumbnail

Opinion: Neuroscience has to grapple with a long legacy of racism if it wants to move into the future

STAT

Many parts of neuroscience research have a race problem. Black people are often excluded from studies due to the texture of their hair , receive erroneous and inaccurate readings due to the melanin content of their skin , and are severely underrepresented in neuroimaging datasets. Now neurotechnology is undergoing a moment of tremendous change, as Elon Musk’s Neuralink has obtained independent review board approval to conduct its first human trials for the R1 robot and N1 brain implant.

358
358
article thumbnail

STAT+: CRISPR’s pioneers reflect on the first gene-editing treatment

STAT

The revolution started in silence. Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier, now Nobelists , published their first paper announcing a new enzyme for editing DNA in Science in June 2012. It was called CRISPR-Cas9. It wasn’t until January 2013 that the first paper showing the enzyme would work in cells, from Feng Zhang, was published, also in Science.

363
363
article thumbnail

New research supports potential link between low-level lead exposure and liver injury

STAT

Nearly a decade on, the Flint water crisis still looms large in the minds of environmental toxin researchers. It was — and continues to be — evidence that not all communities in the United States are equally affected by environmental pollutants. “It’s true that they’re sort of ubiquitous, but they aren’t uniformly distributed.

358
358
article thumbnail

STAT+: Even as Wegovy rides high, interest surges in weight loss drugs that preserve muscle

STAT

Have you ever seen a mouse with a set of muscles more appropriate for a bodybuilder or comic book superhero? Well, 25 years ago, researchers at Johns Hopkins University made it happen. By silencing a gene responsible for producing a protein called myostatin, they directed tiny mouse bodies to grow double the amount of lean muscle they would normally, leading to mice with bulky arms, defined pectorals, and an overall more substantial body mass.

article thumbnail

Flu season is approaching, CDC says

STAT

Flu activity in many parts of the United States is starting to rise more rapidly, signaling that flu season is on the horizon, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday. With Americans set to travel for Thanksgiving gatherings next week, people who’ve been waiting to get a flu shot should think about acting now, Alicia Budd, the CDC’s team lead for domestic flu surveillance, told STAT.

363
363
article thumbnail

Opinion: The FDA is at a crossroads on cell and gene therapies

STAT

Cell and gene therapies are the next frontier in medicine and promise long-sought hope for people living with incurable and fatal conditions. As their promise increasingly becomes reality, the FDA’s gatekeeping role is important. To truly serve the people who need these medications, the FDA must be a good-faith partner and deploy the tools my fellow congressional lawmakers and I helped secure.

361
361
article thumbnail

Report: Measles cases and deaths increase worldwide, as childhood vaccinations rates decline

STAT

A dangerous decline in the rate of children vaccinated against measles is spurring a global increase in cases and deaths from the highly contagious virus, according to a report released Thursday. Estimated measles cases rose 18% to 9 million in 2022 when compared to the previous year, and deaths rose by 43% to 136,200, according to the report , jointly authored by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Vaccines 364
article thumbnail

STAT+: U.K. approves world’s first CRISPR-based medicine, giving greenlight to therapy for sickle cell, thalassemia

STAT

LONDON — Regulators in the U.K. on Thursday approved a CRISPR-based medicine to treat both sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia, making it the world’s first therapy built on the revolutionary gene-editing technology and ushering in a new phase of genetic medicine.   The authorization of the therapy, from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and CRISPR Therapeutics, is itself not a surprise.